Premiere: Stream Mauno’s new album ‘Tuning’ in full

Stream Mauno’s new album ‘Tuning’ in full

The Nova Scotia quartet’s latest is out on Friday

Nova Scotia quartet Mauno are releasing their newest LP ‘Tuning’ via Tin Angel Records on Friday (October 13th) and you can stream the whole wonderful thing exclusively below.

Full of tricksy time signatures and lush vocals, it’s a beautifully complex beast that channels pre-Preoccupations band Women in its impossible to pin down dynamics.

We caught up with singer Nick Everett to learn a lil’ bit more about the release.

Hello Mauno! Describe what you could see around you/ out your window during the writing and recording of the record?

Well, we recorded it in Halifax at Alex Sheppard’s house on Chebucto St., the precolonial Mi’kmaq name for Halifax Harbour meaning literally “Big or Chief Harbour”. Out the front window of the room we recorded it in, you can see the Lebanese community centre and Orthodox church, the Ummah Mosque, and the Maritime Conservatory. The street itself is small but somehow, I guess because Halifax was planned by wandering cows or something, it’s a main thoroughfare for commuters so there’s quite a bit of traffic. There’s a big front porch which is a rarity on the east coast and we spent a lot of time out there talking sounds over and smoking.

Tell us an interesting story behind one of the tracks.

For ‘Shy Shep’, we needed a soundscape of the actual making of the record: a soundscape that placed the listener in the studio rather than on the receiving end of a recording process. When it came time to have the actual back and forth that we normally did when talking about a mix, Shep clammed up and said nothing, leaving me talking alone and sounding like an autocrat. That’s where the name came from. Had a better ring to it than ‘Bossy Nick’.

Where did you go to record the field recordings on the album and what was your favourite discovery?

We recorded the field recordings all over Halifax and one in Heidelberg, where Eliza lived last summer while we were conceptualizing the record. I wandered around with a pocket recorder blasted with headphones on for a few days. I guess what was most surprising about making the soundscapes was that I couldn’t believe the sound my own body made as I moved through spaces with traffic and construction and people talking. Everywhere I went I could hear the rustling of my coat or me clearing my throat. I think as a listener or an observer I often forget that I’m having an effect on the space I’m in while taking it in. It took a lot of self-restraint to not have my breathing or shuffling feet in literally every soundscape.

‘Tuning’ is released via Tin Angel on October 13th

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