Introducing Get to know… Family Time

Get To Know… Family Time

Making their name by duping owners of all-inclusives in Mallorca, this pair are anything but ordinary.

Hello and welcome to DIY’s introducing feature, Get To Know… With two new acts a week, the feature pretty much does what it says on the tin: getting you a little bit closer to the buzziest new acts that have been catching our eye as of late, and working out what makes them tick.

We’ve recently introduced you to Oxford’s Lacuna Common, Coventry newcomers FEET, bilingual synth-popper MUNYA, shimmering folk singer Elena Setién, Brighton’s DITZ and New York’s Gus Dapperton. Today, we’re with Spanish/London duo Family Time.

Retiring from their home of London to Mallorca last spring, the pair set up a studio on the island to begin writing for the project. Once they had an arsenal of songs ready, they took them to the island’s famous all-inclusiveholiday resorts. Posing as a covers band to get the gig, they then delighted (subjected?) bemused holidaymakers to their new creations.

Listen to first track ‘Magic Abyss Hotel’, all woozy guitars from the schools of Mac DeMarco and Tame Impala, and get to know the band a little better below.

Describe your music to us in the form of a Tinder bio.

It’s heavy elevator music for the faint of heart.

What’s your earliest musical memory?

Our first combined memory is probably singing traditional Catalan Christmas carols at the family home in Barcelona. There’s a whole lot of us so it makes for a bit of sinister scene. The songs can get pretty dark too.

Who were some artists that inspired you when you were just starting out (and why)?

We started making music together at fourteen, and I think one of the first bands we really bonded over was Mount Kimbie. There was a very wise use of sound in their music, and it really hit us hard. They were, and still are, really cool dudes.

You’re based between London and Berlin - what’s the music scene like there at the moment? Are there other artists breaking through at the same time that you take inspiration from?

It’s very frisky in Berlin, I haven’t been here long enough to make my mind up but the amount of events (of all shapes and forms) happening is almost overwhelming. There’s a sense of freedom when it comes to nightlife, especially because it’s socially more laissez-faire.

Musically or otherwise, what are you most looking forward to in 2019?

We’re both excited about gradually developing our live set into a full-blown show, something like an operatic event. The music sort of deserves it, it was meant to have some cinematic quality to it. We have some good friends in the band who give us the space to play around with things and try out the wackier stuff. As a listener-spectator, a commitment to putting on a real show can be rewarding, and it’s also more enjoyable for us if we keep things spicy.

If people could take away one thing from your music, what would it be?

The Spaniards do it better.

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