Neu Pick: QTY aim for global domination with ‘World Breaker’

New York newcomers chat to DIY - hear their storming latest track ‘World Breaker’, too.

Every weekday, DIY’s new music know-it-all Neu brings you one essential new release to get obsessed with. Today’s Neu Pick comes from QTY.

With their statement debut ‘Rodeo’, QTY nailed their colours to the mast. An effortlessly cool slice of glammed up, city streets rock ‘n’ roll, it burst free of their New York home, bringing the essence of those boroughs along for the ride.

Latest track ‘World Breaker’ - the flip-side to ‘Rodeo’ - harnesses all that swagger, but pulls back the pace. A more considered, softened take on their observational tunes, the call-and-response vocals are yet more evidence of the duo’s inextricably intertwined personalities.

Sink into ‘World Breaker’ below - it’s set for a 16th December release via Dirty Hit, home of the likes of Wolf Alice, The 1975, The Japanese House and more. Underneath the player, QTY open up for the first time since the typewritten letter that marked their arrival, telling DIY all about their earliest days and musical kindred spirits.

So you met over an ice-cream - important questions first, do you remember the flavour?

It was a Mr. Softie truck on Houston. There were sprinkles and I believe we split a swirled cone, but it was more circumstantial then anything. Ice cream does happen to play a significant role in our relationship today though, and we don't want to exist without it.

New York’s always had an effortlessly cool music scene - how was it growing up around that?

We think anything that’s actually "cool" kind of has to be inherently effortless. What has always been really great about New York is that you're allowed to be yourself, alongside whoever else you'd like to be. Growing up you're kind of encouraged to be self-destructive but that lends itself to character growth. We were definitely immersed in our surroundings but not part of any movement or scene. We were always aware of the historical implications that go hand in hand with playing music here but we aren't consciously imitating them.

Do you think the city’s inspired your sound at all?

We love a lot of New York bands and we definitely devoured all the seminal ones (Television, Lou Reed, Patti Smith, etc...) when we were growing up and figuring out who we were and how we fit into everything. The city is in our DNA whether we want it to be or not, but it doesn't define us. The landscape of New York City has more of a threshold in terms of what we create. Some of the best parts about living in NYC are that you have to create ways for things to feel familiar because of the size of the city.

Are there any other bands in the Big Apple that we should be keeping a close eye on?

We used to be really involved in what was going on here. We were playing shows a few times a week for years and you can't really do that without making friends with other bands and genuinely wanting them to succeed so we couldn't really give an answer without being biased in that way. Two people / groups that we're just waiting to watch take over the world are Ariel East and Public Access TV. There are also groups we love like the Dirty Fences and newer ones just coming up that we've enjoyed seeing grow like Poppies.

Talk us through ‘World Breaker’.

World Breaker is an expressive song sung through circumstantial stories and situations. We've have seen a lot and been through a lot together and i think the song conveys that and includes all the degradation and hardships alongside all the beauty and love that follow you when you've got a deep and meaningful relationship like ours. We're both haunted but we're in it together.

What’s QTY’s game plan, then?

We just finished recording our debut full length in London with Bernard Butler. We couldn't be happier with it but for the next few months while we're getting ready for its release we'll be rehearsing with the band and playing around. We've been dying to get on the road and show everyone what we have to offer. Hopefully we can connect with people and provide some kind of escape. Strength in numbers - hope prevails.

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