Listen The 1975 release ‘Me & You Together Song’

The 1975 release ‘Me & You Together Song’

The latest taste of ‘Notes On A Conditional Form’ arrives with unabashed pop-rock flair.

Spoken word, punk, ambient house, and now 00s-style pop-rock, The 1975 are giving us our latest taste of what we can expect from fourth album ‘Notes On A Conditional Form’ - now delayed until 24th April - and, once again, it’s nothing like we could have thought it would be.

Channelling some early ’00s Busted vibes, ‘Me & You Together Song’ is an upbeat pop banger that could seamlessly fit onto the aforementioned pop-punk trio’s self-titled 2002 album. Basically, if Busted tried to write their best ‘It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You)’, it would sound a lil’ bit like this.

“It’s kind of me as a teenager; it’s about idealism in relationships and trying to capture what I thought about Amy Watson or Chelsea Pollard,” Matty told us for our November 2019 cover interview. “And there are funny lines in it. When I write about relationships, I find it quite hard to be soppy so my sincerity comes from gags. ‘I had a dream where we had kids / You would cook, I’d do the nappies / We went to Winter Wonderland / It was shit but we were happy’. Which is my way of saying I actually love you quite a lot.”

An anthemic love bop tracing Matty’s efforts to profess his feelings, the rose-tinted glasses behind which the story is told are reflected perfectly in the jingly tune that Matty called a ‘Drive Like I Do’ style song, and it’s destined to invoke a sense of nostalgia for those old enough to remember the ‘What I Go To School For’ glory days.

Their fourth release from the album so far, ‘NOACF’ is gearing up to be The 1975’s most ambitious and experimental project yet.

WE’VE GOT A FAVOUR TO ASK

We’re often asked about you, our readers. So we’d really appreciate it if you’d offer up a bit of information about you, and your music-loving habits by filling in our 2019 readers’ survey.

Click here to reach the 2019 DIY readers’ survey.

(Don’t worry, none of what we’re asking for is personally identifiable - and no questions are compulsory.)

More like this

Family Portrait: Rina Sawayama

Family Portrait: Rina Sawayama

Reaching in to examine her multi-cultural background, family history and queer identity, Rina Sawayama’s debut is a complicated, compassionate (yet catchy) portrait of an artist embracing herself.