Neu Bulletin The Neu Bulletin (Malady, The Early Mornings, Allison Ponthier and more!)

The Neu Bulletin (Malady, The Early Mornings, Allison Ponthier and more!)
Photo: Will Reid and Ed Reid

DIY’s essential, weekly guide to the best new music.

Neu Bulletins are DIY’s guide to the best new music. They contain every new track by an exciting, emerging artist that’s been played at full volume in the office over the past seven days, whether that’s a small handful or a gazillion gems. Just depends how good the week’s been.

We’ve also got a handy Spotify playlist where you can find all the tracks featured in Neu, so you can listen to all our hot tips in one place: head this way!

Malady - Famous Last Words

Following the release of their debut single 'London I Love You But You're Bringing Me Down', London quartet Malady are back with their newest offering 'Famous Last Words'. A dazzling feel good number incorporating the band's love of electronic textures with undeniable grooves, in their own words the track is "a rumination about purpose - the realisation that any notion of inherent, and/or divine, purpose is false and subsequently the futile, scrambled attempts to forge meaning in places that meaning can never really be found". (Elly Watson)

The Early Mornings - Days Spent

Following on from last month's meandering but gritty 'Blank Sky', Manchester trio The Early Mornings are back with another dose of their raw post-punk. This time swinging into action with an altogether noisier intro, 'Days Spent' still perfectly showcases the band's love of angular guitars, but this time, the song swirls around an addictively melodic chorus. A scuzzy instrumental soon draws the track to a close, proving this to be a more complex beast than it may have first appeared. (Sarah Jamieson)

Allison Ponthier - Harshest Critic

Unveiling her latest single, Allison Ponthier's 'Harshest Critic' is a dreamy new track from the Texas songwriter, tackling her insecurities and the relationship between the performer and audience. A Kacey Musgraves-esque blend of delicate country and pop melodies, its raw and reflective nature is instantly mesmerising, destined to have you hooked after the first listen. (Elly Watson)

Psykhi - White Picket Fence

‘White Picket Fence’ is the first outing from Ghanaian-born artist Psykhi, and both shows off a wonderfully ‘90s slacker rock vocal style, spoken word in parts, meandering wilfully in others, and possesses one of the most gloriously grungy riffs 2021’s seen so far. It all conspires to make for a hypnotic ear worm with bite. (Emma Swann)

Kamal - Lose

There's something that feels incredibly profound about 'lose', the latest track to come from songwriter Kamal. Billed as a "broken love song", there's a fragile beauty to the reflective nature of the North West Londoner's newest track, which explores the conflict and hardships that can lie at the heart of a relationship. Backed by a video set in a stark but stunning cliff top location, with the waves rolling beneath him, this is a track that's guaranteed to move you. (Sarah Jamieson)

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