Photo: Sophie Hur

Tracks: Soccer Mommy, King Princess, Beabadoobee and more

It’s time for the biggest and best new music of the week.

After last week’s bumper bounty, did we expect the metaphorical water-cannon of new music to stop? Of course not! This week saw Soccer Mommy reveal details of a new Oneohtrix Point Never-produced album, King Princess return with a new track, Beabadoobee share a few more details of her new record (and Harry Styles far less: we don’t even have the first song from ‘Harry’s House’ yet) and much more.

For our run-down of the week’s biggest and best, read on - to feast your audiovisual senses on a whole hundred hot new numbers, view our Essential New Tracks playlist below.

Soccer Mommy - Shotgun

Soccer Mommy being produced by Oneohtrix Point Never is one of the most unexpected artistic team-ups we’ve come across this year, as well as one of the most exciting. On ‘Shotgun’, the first teaser of Sophie Allison’s new album ‘Sometimes, Forever’, Daniel Lopatin’s touch is light; the catchy, light indie-rock bop isn’t immediately reminiscent of any of his prior projects, but his input immediately gives the track a fuller, more rounded feel. (Will Richards)

King Princess - For My Friends

On ‘For My Friends’, King Princess strips it back and builds it up for an ode to friendship that’s celebratory, vulnerable, and gorgeous. Her vocal delivery is so laden with emotion that in the darker moments it’s almost pained, but as in the friendships she’s singing about, the hard moments just make the great moments soar higher. Against her characteristic backdrop of sprawling synths and NYC night-time glamour, King Princess pours out gratitude and love and brutal honesty – “loving me takes patience” – on a heartwarming, intimate listen. (Ims Taylor)

Beabadoobee - Talk

Beabadoobee isn’t launching a new era, she’s launching a universe: ‘Beatopia’. With lead single ‘Talk’, Bea builds on the rock-star chops she built with ‘Fake It Flowers’, diving headfirst deeper into her glitter-coated grunge. Enchantingly simple, ‘Talk’ is just about going out on a Tuesday – nostalgic, and carefree, making questionable decisions just ‘cause you feel like it and you’re in the swing of something fun. It’s totally charming, and cements Bea’s rocky sound as well as her smiley authenticity. (Ims Taylor)

Lykke Li - NO HOTEL

Having followed 2018’s darkly sensual ‘So Sad So Sexy’ with similarly sad bop gem and Mark Ronson team-up ‘Late Night Feelings’ the following year, ‘NO HOTEL’, the first taste of the Swede’s forthcoming fifth studio album ‘Eyeye’, is somewhat of an about-turn. Lykke’s vocals take centre stage over barely-there instrumentation, while her similarly subdued voice is filled with longing. “You’re still in love with someone else,” she sings, “And I’m on your doorstep, not losing yet.” Sounds like she might be all about the ‘so sad’ this time around. (Bella Martin)

Mykki Blanco ft. Michael Stipe – Family Ties

Another truly unexpected collaboration in today’s Tracks round-up, the experimental rapper Mykki Blanco and R.E.M. alt-rock god Michael Stipe fit together perfectly on ‘Family Ties’. The sombre and moody track – feelings accentuated by its monochrome video – sees Mykki dialling down their chaos and stepping into Michael’s world, a universe of raw emotion and slow-building, brooding sounds. (Will Richards)

The Vaccines - Disaster Girl

By this point, more than a decade into their career as everyone’s favourite indie booster shot, the fact that The Vaccines can write a catchy earworm is pretty much a non-argument. The sky is blue. The grass is green. Justin Young can pen a hummable hook in his sleep. ‘Disaster Girl’ - taken from the quintet’s forthcoming ‘Planet of the Youth’ EP - then is, yes, catchy, but its best moment is when it flips to an unexpected bridge, swapping out rollocking mile-a-minute forward motion for The Vaccines’ less celebrated trick of nailing classic, swoony melody. (Lisa Wright)

Disclosure ft. RAYE – Waterfall

Compared to the last two pairings here, Disclosure and RAYE feel like comparatively obvious bedfellows. On ‘Waterfall’, they do what both of them do best, and nothing more. Over a signature, shuffling house beat from the Lawrence brothers, RAYE provides a silky, nimble vocal on a song that’s begging to be consumed with a warm tin in a festival field. See ya there. (Will Richards)

Working Men’s Club - Widow

On their self-titled 2020 debut, Working Men’s Club made a record full of aggressive hedonism, coaxing the ravey spirit of the Haçienda out of retirement for one last gurn around the club (or, given the timeframe, the living room). On the band’s return however, chief songwriter Syd Mynskey-Sargeant is dealing in slightly softer strokes. Don’t worry, WMC haven’t gone all folk on us; ‘Widow’ still bounces around on icy new wave synths, with a general sense of spacey retro-futurism. But there’s something less brittle here - not least in its lyrics, which tackle bereavement and loss. (Lisa Wright)


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