Festivals Pumarosa point forwards at Latitude 2016

London five-piece give hints of future headliner status with a bewitching Sunrise Arena set.

Swirling her arms like a possessed windmill, Isabel Munoz-Newsome can’t help but break her trance – just for a second – to marvel at the imitative routines across the front row. Already a ridiculously polished band as they began to play their first ever ‘proper’ gigs just six months ago, Pumarosa’s spell has only grown more potent over time.

They’re a locked in lot, Pumarosa. Neville James is the go-to man for twinkling sprinkings of guitar glitter, at odds with the abrasive grind of Isabel attacking her guitar with a drum beater. Tomoya Suzuki whips up a synthetic storm from behind his desk of gadgetry, exchanging careful glances with Henry Brown’s steady melodic pulse, and Nicholas Owens’ tumbling rhythms. Remove any one of the band, and the magic they have would collapse.

It’s during the back-to-back heady, steely-edged marathon of ‘Priestess’ – coupled with an airing of a brand new song to close - where Pumarosa reveal a window into what’s next. With an ability to swerve off in about a hundred million tangents, yet bring it back to something that sounds intrinsically like them, this bunch surely have a stonker of a debut up their sleeves.

Latitude 2016: Pumarosa Latitude 2016: Pumarosa Latitude 2016: Pumarosa

Photos: Poppy Marriott.

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