Album Review: Deptford Goth - Songs

Finally comfortable with minimalism, Woolhouse is surely the only one left underestimating his sound.

Rating:

Since bobbing off and leaving behind the streets of South East London for sunny, sandy Margate, Daniel Woolhouse seems to have a happier, more confident disposition. Without wanting to stretch his new-found Margatification too far, ‘Songs’ sounds like a warmer, sunnier record, too. 

Finally comfortable with minimalism, Woolhouse is surely the only one left underestimating his sound. He may have given ‘Songs’ an overly modest title, but moments like the stripped-back vulnerability of ‘Dust’ and the lyrical mirroring of ‘The Lovers’ show Deptford Goth at his minimal best.

‘Songs’ might be missing the fragmented, clouded anxiety of his debut record ‘Life After Defo’, but then again, after hearing so much shade from Woolhouse, it’s intriguing to hear him basking in the light.

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