Album Review White Fence - For the Recently Found Innocent

Presley isn’t trying to reach new listeners or incorporate new genres, opting to keep things simple instead.

Rating:

Tim Presley’s been a constant figure in the Californian garage rock scene since the late nineties, and has shown his best side through striking out on his own under the White Fence moniker. In the past three and a half years he’s released an impressive six solo full-lengths, one collaborative LP with Ty Segall, a live album as well as starting his own record label – and with ‘For the Recently Found Innocent’ he’s brought White Fence into the studio for the first time.

Abandoning recording sessions consisting of a 4-track in your bedroom in favour of moving into a studio might seem like a big shift, but here it hasn’t heralded any change in sound. Recorded in fellow fan of simplicity Ty Segall’s home studio, ‘For The Recently Found Innocent’ is a logical step forward in Presley’s evolution – it’s a little bit more focused and a little bit tighter, but still very much a garage rock record.

Whether we’re looking at his time leading the psychedelic stylings of Darker My Love in the latter half of the ‘00s, the acoustic folk leanings of his early White Fence material or the ‘60s garage rock revivalism of the Ty Segall collaboration ‘Hair’, Presley’s core influences have remained the same. ‘For The Recently Found Innocent’ is steeped in the same mould; garage rock, ‘60s pop, folk and psych mixed together to create a sound that is distinctly Presley’s own.

While ‘To the Recently Found Innocent’ might not surprise, it’s a joyous listen. Presley isn’t trying to reach new listeners or incorporate new genres, opting to keep things simple instead of over-using the possibilities of a proper studio, and in doing so again proves that he’s pretty damn good at what he does. 

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