Album Review British Sea Power - Let The Dancers Inherit The Party

British Sea Power - Let The Dancers Inherit The Party

Every bit the embodiment of empowered pop-rock perfection that its title suggests.

Rating:

It’s been four years since we last heard anything from British Sea Power, but tenth album ‘Let The Dancers Inherit The Earth’ is every bit the embodiment of empowered pop-rock perfection that its title suggests. Created against a backdrop of “politicians perfecting the art of unabashed lying, social-media echo chambers, click-bait and electronic Tonka Toys to keep us entertained and befuddled,” the album takes wide-eyed escapism and directs it into making the moment we’re in as majestic as can be. 

“You’re no longer asking why,” Jan Scott Wilkinson sings on ‘International Space Station’, a cry out against the ambivalence it can be oh-so-easy to fall into. This isn’t a record built to challenge though - in fact, it’s quite the opposite. Fuelled by an energy of discontent, British Sea Power have created an album that offers escape from the confusion and presents an energy bounding on towards change. 

Rhythms echo anthemically throughout, urging ever onwards towards a bright new horizon. Jan’s vocals sail with effortless grace, ringing clear with the promise of a smoother road ahead. It’s the sound of a band reinvigorated, inspired into action by the world around them - a feat this record nobly strives to achieve itself. 

With the irresistible echoes of ‘Keep On Trying’ British Sea Power are at their most danceable, leading into the brilliantly titled ‘Electric Kittens’ - a song purpose-built for swaying cigarette lighters in the air while holding loved ones close. Ending with the sprawling ‘Alone Piano’, the record catapults to spheres beyond. Standing open-armed and resolute for whatever might follow, ‘Let The Dancers Inherit The Earth’ is an echoing cry for a bright tomorrow. 

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