Album Review: Wet - Don’t You

Unflinchingly honest, Wet don’t specialise in happy endings, but they’re always telling a good story.

Rating:

Kelly Zutrau knows a thing or two about heartbreak. Fronting Wet on their debut album ‘Don’t You’, she has a habit of piercing silence with cutting truths. She’ll dismiss hopeless chancers trying to string on to the dying embers of a relationship on ‘It’s All in Vain’, and ‘Don’t Wanna Be Your Girl’ is more a future-paving declaration than a simple refusal. These emotions are complex, but they’re delivered by Zutrau in a simple, straight-for-the-gut fashion.

‘Don’t You’ feels like a debut in the sense that it mimics the feeling of trying something for the first time. Whether it’s a first kiss or the new feeling of a heart shattering into pieces, Wet have you covered. Their sound hasn’t shifted one jot from early buzztastic first steps. The trio have stuck to a solid formula. Zutrau is always at the front, vocals stripped of effects. Guitarist Marty Sulkow is on hand with deadly, finely-constructed lines, while Joe Valle is thrashing his heart out on electronic drums that sound light as a feather.

At first, Wet live up to their name. They’re earnest, soft-hearted souls who wouldn’t hurt a fly, on initial glance. But burrowed deep within ‘Don’t You’ is a don’t-fuck-with-me mantra. Closer ‘These Days’ ends on a simple, cutting conclusion: “Today I am away from you, today time passed strangely.” Unflinchingly honest, Wet don’t specialise in happy endings, but they’re always telling a good story.

Gimme Some Truth: The Murder Capital

Gimme Some Truth: The Murder Capital

On debut ‘When I Have Fears’, Dubliners The Murder Capital set out to explore their inner workings in the most commited way possible. This is what they found.

Swipe Right with Shura

Swipe Right with Shura

Don’t delete your dating apps just yet: on second album ‘forevher’, Shura is back and armed with a testament to the power of very modern romance.

Sunshine People: Friendly Fires

Sunshine People: Friendly Fires

When perma-party-starters Friendly Fires started to question themselves, the result nearly finished the trio off for good. Now, they’re (finally!) back with a new album and a renewed sense of purpose.